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as st. francis of assistissi showe. it means respecting all creatures and respecting the environment where we live. it means respecting people, showing loving concern for each person, especially children, the elderly, those in need who are often the last we think about. it means caring for one another and our families. husbands and wives. first protect one another and then as parents they can care for their children. and children themselves in time protect their parents. it means building sincere friendships from which we protect one another in trust, respect and goodness. in the end, everything has been entrusted to our protection. and all of us are responsible for it. be protectors of god's gifts. whenever human beings fail to live up to this responsibility. whenever we failed to care for creation, and for our brothers and sisters, the way is open to destruction. and hearts are hardened. tragically in every period in history there are herrods who pluck death, wreak havoc and mar the confidence of men and women. i would like to ask all of those who have positions of responsibility i
have suffered. it's a low-interest environment, which makes stocks the only liquid investment game in town and that explains the market we're in. joining me is the the chief economist at rbs securities and ned riley, the ceo. i have laid out why the fed has fuld the rally. when you buy a stock, you're buying a share of its earnings. the price to earnings ratio used to figure out the value of a stock is still low. let's take a look here. i want to show our viewers. the s&p 500 is seeing average earnings of 15. that's the bottom bar. that's half of where they were. lower than where they were five years ago when the dow was trading at about where they are now. that makes me think this isn't just the federal reserve. what do you think? >> it isn't. as a matter of fact, the fear that's in people's hearts right at the moment, it reminds me of rodney dangerfield. the market has no respect. nobody has respect for this market that it is real. clearly we're seeing the public and institutions, i might point out, have been lowering their equity exposure. the the public only has 30% in ek equit
and in the near earth environment. our ability to understand the system is of growing importance to our nation's economy and national security. the electric power industry is susceptible to geomagnetic light induced currents which can overload unprotected power grids and result in widespread power outages. in the spacecraft industry, intense geomagnetic storms have the capacity to disrupt normal operation such as satellite communication, and, of course, they pose risks to astronauts in space. in addition, space weather can cause irregular areas in the signals from our very important global positioning systems. the national oceanic and atmospheric administration, or noaa is the official source for space weather prediction for the nation. several of nasa's research satellites have become essential part of our nation's space weather prediction system providing very important data for determined to space weather conditions. one such mission is the advanced composition explorer which sits in the solar wind ahead of the earth providing early warning of incoming solar storms. finally, orbital debris
division civil, criminal and thÉrÈse, and grants a natural resource and environment. then make recommendations, which go to the assistance. sometimes there's an internal conflict. the department of justice include the criminal division and those people always want to defend guards and seized their presence. sublimates divisions tends to favor and somebody has to resolve those on assistant to the solicitor general may think the criminal division statutory. prosecution is weak. the solicitor general has to resolve those issues. bob bork connected many not only within the government, but also here presentations by private counsel. it's one of the else's traditions that anyone that he can't come kerry i can be hurt by the solicitor general personally for united states files a brief in the supreme court. but prepared carefully and as sharp questions at these meetings. as he said in the book, he tried to advance the position of the executive branch, not his own fears. i never saw him favors on position and misunderstand. you conflate knowledge, understanding and intellectual integrit
the highway. >> she walked quite a distance in a very, very threatening environment. it is very blackout here and very dark. it is very steep. it is brushy and there is also coyotes in the background. to someone who was raised in a more urban environment as opposed to a rural setting that can be quite intimidating. >> the girl's father died from his injuries, but she escaped from the crash and her trek through the wilderness with a few cuts and bruises. >>> a round of nasty weather forced the cancellation of a professional golf tournament in florida. look how dangerous conditions were with strong wind gusts and even blowing over the large media center. tense moments after it was evacuated. the storm put a damper on tiger woods' golf game. suspending play. woods only got in two holes thus delayed play until tomorrow. the tornado warning was issued, but there are no confirmed sight ings tonight. and for the weather here in the bay area, let's get to leigh glaser who is tracking what is ahead. >> right now live doppler 7hd and we are not picking up any returns at all, but we are starting to see
flying about 70 satellites. so we're pretty familiar with the space environment and the risks it entails. as a global fleet operator serving both commercial and government customers, reliability and continuity of service are our highest priorities. whether it's uav operations over afghanistan or the final game of the ncaa tournament or financial statements that have to be transferred securely around the world, um, we know that our customers expect flawless performance. to deliver this level of performance, we have to daily deal with a range of threats. probably a highest priority for us today is radio frequency interference. many times it's accidental, sometimes intentional. space debris and other challenges of space flight, cyber attacks, solar weather, space systems reliability, the fact that we today don't have an affordable technical solution for refueling and repairing satellites on orbit and last but not least, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. s
, very threatening environment, it's very black out here, very dark. bill: a child escaping a crash, but finding herself in new danger when she's forced to find help in the dead of night. heather: and the future of the republican party, karl rove weighing in, why he is saying, don't give up just yet. bill: 10:30 in new york. karl rove over the weekend arguing that the republican party isn't over just yet, shooting down any suggestion that the party is past its praoeup. >> let's be clear, before we assign the republican party to the dust bin of history, 30 out of 50 governors in the united states are republicans. republicans have elected in 2010 the largest number of state legislators since 1920. the majority of state legislators are republicans. we have two robust parties, each with their own problems. the republican party has its problems, the democratic party has its problems and we are likely to see a competitive, political environment for decades to come. bill: i want to talk about this with former arizona senator jon kyl, a fox news contributor. welcome back here. >> thanks, go
been here longer. it's not the kind of environment that the achievers want to go into and stay in and it doesn't make teachers feel valued at all. i got in a little bit of trouble the other night because i was giving a speech in california. and i was lamenting the fact that the teachers don't get paid enough to it i said think about this. i said basketball players. now, why my husband is a former nba player. this is why i got in trouble at home to it i said basketball players get paid $12 million a year for troubling of all -- dribbling around. we should be 12 million to our highly effective teachers in the nation because they are determining the future of our nation. but we have a skewed culture where we don't actually respect and honor teachers for the incredible work that they do. we certainly don't pay them what they are worth. >> in australia they have 200 days of public schools. in china and india is 200 days of public school instruction. in the united states, why do you think in the united states it is only 180 days? which is drastic if you take between china and india i
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> you testified she had the gun in her mouth. i screamed no. they kill me for telling the truth. >> i knew phil specter played there by al pacino. i always thought he was at least half crazy. i will tell you some of the stories if we have time. he was also a genius who produced songs like to know him is to love him. you lost that loving feeling. let it be by the beatles and a ton of pop rock classics from the 1960s. he was always a weirdo and in 2003 he was accused of killing his girlfriend with a single shot to the face at point blank range. his lawyers including our friend linda kenny baden argued that clarkson killed herself. on sunday night, hbo has a spectacular murder out about the murder and the trial stars al pacino and the great hell lin miron playing linda baden. she is married to
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
. but this is what you expect from the federal government. your education, roads, bridges, a healthy environment, and what's mandated by the constitution, our armed forces to protect us. but this is where it gets really scary. all of this blue part here for medicare, social security is what we take in. in other words, all of our cash on hand, if you will, the money that you pay the federal government every time you get a paycheck or pay your income taxes, this is all devoted to medicare, medicaid, social security. in other words, everything else, your education, the environment, our roads, bridges, ports, armed forces all of that money to pay for that basically is borrowed. it's just borrowed, or worse just printed. this is the sad reality that we are facing today. but with republican house leadership and working with democrats who are actually willing to come to the table and compromise and not just work with us, work for you, we can save social security and medicare. by the way, when you hear democrats, or see the videos of them throwing your grandmother off a cliff or telling you that republi
life could have, indeed, once existed there. >> for the first time we are seeing an ancient environment on mars which is habitable. it just looks different than the planet does today instead of red, it's gray. there was plenty of water. >> curiosity landed on mars back in august, you might recall. the mission last one martian year. that translates into 687 earth days, shepard. we're about halfway through. >> shepard: all right. casey stegall in dallas tonight. cabin owners are now looking for what's left after a huge fire ripped through a mountain side resort. and that tops our news across newark. america. tennessee, the fire broke out late sunday night at a cabin near the north carolina border. heavy winds quickly fanned the flames to dozens of other structures. black hawk helicopters help battled thing all day yesterday. officials say some rain fall last night finally helped contain the thing. it charred some 200 acres and destroyed more than 60 cabins. nobody hurt. maryland. a massive water main break beneath a busy intersection north of d.c. the pipe burst last night sending water 2
of the committee on the environment. >> the fact that all of this is happening is due to man-made gases i really believe is the greatest hoax ever perpetrate on the american people. >> perhaps more troubling, senator inhofe told rachel maddow last year that he used to believe climate change was real, until he realized the solution wasn't free of charge. >> i was actually on your side of this issue, when i was chairing that committee and i first heard about this, i thought, until i found out what it cost. >> you see, for senator inhofe, the cost was the problem. particularly, the cost to his re-election hopes. the top funders of senator inhofe's campaign since 2006 are from the oil and gas industries, to the tune of nearly $500,000. inhofe's top contributors all benefit from loose environmental regulations. instead of blaming a groundhog for the unpredictable nature of our changing climate, perhaps we should point the finger at the actual human beings who have the power to do something about it. or maybe punxsutawney phil should look for some benefactors in the energy industry. that seems like th
in this environment to watch your costs. once the risks to this up costs. why, why, why. >> we have our health insurance dictated by where we work. what is that? that is because of wage and price controls, world war ii era, and we -- neil: i understand. >> it is what it is, but that is what you get. will double down the existing system and cement that time between employer and employee. neil: or you serve it with a government single payer system. >> ultimately you don't own your own information. this is inevitable croupy result of really bad public policy. neil: the producers after the show. >> you're going to see more and more of this, especially from large and medium-sized organizations. cbs with 200,000 employees, they are just mimicking what the federal government is modeling. be evasive, control the health care cost. neil: i don't like the intrusion, but i understand what they're up against. >> up against increased health care costs. think about it. there are a public entity. their job is to add shareholder value and equity. if they get to lower air expenses by having more help the employ
and are starting to increase dividends. an increase in the interest rate environment for the banks would be positive for the bottom line. shibani: ralph, what about you? anything you're staying away from and you wouldn't touch with a 10 foot pole? >> i mentioned it before the emerging markets have been lagging. i think it is too early to buy into emerging markets. i think part of that problem is the fact that there is a question about growth and, as a result of that, you have a lot of the commodity not doing very, very well like steel and copper and things like that. i think i would avoid that for a while. shibani: all right, ralph and jim, thank you very much for joining us today. david: thanks, gentlemen. happy weekend. >> thank you. >> you too. shibani: leaders of the european union are locked in bailout talks as the clock wind down for the country to raise 5.8 billion euros in order to receive a much-needed bailout. we'll go live to the heart of all the action to cyprus. david: how many people would buy that country right now, speaking of cyprus, the idea of confiscating people's inc
environment -- i would be hard to imagine if in june they come back with the ruling on the doma case and prop 8 case and they maintain doma and maintain -- it's just hard to imagine in this environment. there would be such a backlash. the public is so ahead of where these laws were in 2004 and 2008. >> bill: absolutely. 866-55-press if you want to weigh in on this very very significant movement in the direction in support of marriage equality. you mentioned and you referred to the -- we love the phrase autopsy. in that this is what the republicans are calling it the point we have made here several times. it's an unusual choice of a phrase -- if you want -- that you do not perform autopsy on bodies you expect to come back to life. >> they are dead. >> bill: exactly they are cold. but that's what they are calling it. at any rate, one of the things is outreach. we're going to spend $10 million reaching out to women and to blacks and to latinos and they are already violating it you report on think progress. >> they violated moments after -- you have this big endorse
is not only the environment -- although he did use the word environment -- but it's also us. it's you and me, our brothers and sisters, it's moms and dads. that's part of our mission in life, to be of service to others. ♪ ♪ ♪ >> we tried to get out of the way of the music from time to time. it's mid 50's in rome this morning and pretty steady wind at 15 to 20 miles an hour. you can see making for a beautiful sight with the flags there. the music is not one choir but two. lauren green with some details on those. one of them sang at the pap al mass. >> this is the sistine chapel choir along with the sacred music choir. both of them are vatican choirs. interesting enough, the last time i heard the sistine chapel choir was in november when they premiered a work by monsignor raptsinger, the brother of pope benedict xvi. they are an incredible choir. you saw one of the members, sopranos singing earlier as part of the mass. they are an incredible choir. they have sung all over the world and they are known all over the world, and they sing in many sacred music festivals. they are mainstays of
, and the poor, and the environment, in all of god's creatures underneath it. we have an excerpt from the homily that pope francis gave. take a listen. >> let us protect christ in our life in order to protect others in order to protect creation. the vocation of protecting does not regard just us christians. it has a dimension that proceeds and that is simply human. it regards everyone. it is protecting the entire creati creation, the beauty of creation. as the book of genesis tells us. >> father edward beck, cnn describe outer, good to have you, as always. that message, simple, simply human, we have to take care of everybody, what do you think it means to those leaders from 132 different delegations? >> we can't help but hear that in reference to sexual abuse scandal, i don't think, especially from an american context. all of those leaders there know the problems the catholic church has had. and how many times did he say, protector, protector, protector. he said at one point protector of children. and so that certainly is going to be a message coming out of this. the sex abuse scandal, and his p
. that is designed in which case they will certify the platform, the operator and the operational environment. >> be some fairly confident that will lead to improvements come at any making sure -- >> most definitely. get 50 different countries petition from 37 states involved in the six identified in the reauthorization bill are being funded by the states. in the future, every state can have their own test site in order to ensure the technology deployed in the national airspace system backspace. >> ms. stepanovich, some proponents of sub for, said the technology argue current safeguards provides a significant protection of privacy and they know we have on the books related to the subject knowledge he, was third in the books related to use of other technologies that can overlap and include this type of technology. certain remedies that provide civil remedies for violations of those laws. some have suggested legal protections should apply the only two drones and may be sufficient to alleviate constitutional problems are privacy concerns. in your view, is this approach correct and what are the m
today's complicated issues in today's environment? >> would you agree there is some responsibility on the part of the members of congress to educate themselves to be able to speak about this? >> absolutely. >> because we were knee deep in the fight and they had no clue. >> you are absolutely right. i spent basically 14 months doing nothing but talking about health care reform. and i would walk into a room in my district with 50 people who wr were ready to strangle me, and spend 50 minutes going through the options, and after that period of time, they would walk out and say, hey, this sounds great. but it totally was an education process, and we didn't do -- as a party we didn't do very good job of that. individual people did better than others for sure. >> hal: right. and we only have a couple of seconds left with you, and first of all i want to thank you for being the congressman from the great state of kentucky but there is one other issue, and i want to personally thank you. and you can go to yarmuth.house.gov, is that you are talking about introducing -
world leaders on the big spring, he having told them to respect the environment, think about the weak and the poor. once again this pope bringing his simple style to the most grand of ceremonies. catholics and the simply curious of every color and creed gathered for a ceremony stretching back thousands of years. 132 official delegations from around the world came, and leaders of every faith. few religious celebrations as grand, or steeped in ritual as the installation of a pope in the catholic church. from early in the day, hundreds of thousands poured into the square. the pope choosing to greet them in an open jeep instead of the well-protected pope mobile. at one point stepping down, reaching out to children, the sick. the cheers of the faithful here, an audible embrace. then the 266th pope praying at the tomb of peter, leaders alongside him healing the divide 1,000 years old. here to witness history, vice president biden and royalty, a humble priest from south america, his message, remember the poor. a communion shared by all, a day no one will forget. and in the last half hour, vi
on the importance of protecting the environment and also talking about how we all need to treat each other with love and kindness, tenderness, and not let omens of destruction, hatred and the zero private the file our lives. >> people clapped and interrupted throughout his speech. he is getting a lot of support on his first day as pope. >> he is conservative on lot of the church doctrine. he did criticize priest who in the past refused to baptize babies born to single mothers. >> that gives you a sense of what we are talking about about his compassion for those less fortunate and that is something obviously people expect out of the position of both. he will be looking to lead the catholic church to the new century. a lot people are hoping he will bring change. in fact, we were talking about the poll numbers for catholics in america for a lot of them are liberal leaning when it comes to social issues. we will see if pope francis will bring change to the church. >> closer to home we are talking about a change in the weather. we're talking about rain years erica with our forecast. good morning. >> and
is the fruit. so even you... could've had a v8. can >>> good saturday afternoon, i am craig mel environment you are watching msnbc. the place for politics. >>> the senate speaks on the key step pipeline a decision from the president is expected soon. we thought it would be a good time to separate fact from fiction on that. >>> a wrap on obama's trip to the middle east. what he acokofrcomp -- accompli. >>> 98 days since newtown and more than 2200 dead. now a branch of the nra is fighting the first gun law passed after that school shooting. let's start with our top political headlines this hour. >>> late yesterday, caitlin hall began withdrew her nomination to a federal appeals court, handing a victory to republicans in the senate who twice blocked the president's pick for the key judicial post h president obama said in a statement, "i am deeply disappointed that even after nearly two and a half years, a minority of senators continue to block a simple up or down vote on her nomination." >>> the democratically led senate rejected paul ryan's budget this week and passed its own in the wee hours of
duplicates environment. we are not implementing that. those models will be useful for future disasters. we have a template for the way to bring those together in a seamless way. to answer thehave question. that is not bad. i will be anxious as we move forward in as you finish your the subcommittee will have some further discussions about what is the net step to make sure it is more seamless and less complicated. >> thank you. the staff has done some good investigative work in the areas north of where i live. >> thank you very much. let me welcome to our witnesses. sandy did damage not only where it was the most visible on the east coast but in the great lakes as well. the forces were so huge that they caused damage to breakwaters and created a problem in harbor is in the great lakes. we have already seen massive damage on the great lakes. we are any disaster situation because of the drought and low water situation. lows,et new record hitting more than 2 feet below their average. this was a drought problem. lake superior is a foot below the long-term average. the army corps is predicting th
globally are expensive, and pollutant and horrible for the environment. >> the power just went out in my neighborhood. we weren't prepared. i was going to get kerosene lamps. this is what i need. >> exactly, buy one. >> this is the 20th century. the world game here soccer balls. >> the one world football project, football meaning a soccer ball and this is an indestructible ball for $40. >> what do you mean indestructible? >> it won't flatten, never deflat deflates, and you buy one and a child gets one. >> no maintenance soccer ball love it. >> this is out of print clothing, t-shirts depicting book covers, a lot of classic books and they're very soft, much like a well loved, well worn book and each time you buy one a book goes to a community in need via the brand's partner, books for africa. >> this is "the great gatsby" what is that? >> an upcoming film you'll hear about soon. i love this one, smile squared toothbrushes. >> biodegradable bamboo toothbrushes for only $6 and each time you buy one a child gets one. >> good idea for the companies and great products. lot of shopping done. >>
important is being present in the work environment. making better decisions for the organization. depending where you are in the company, they take a longer time to have an impact. we will see that over time. that's the importance of having mindfulness and a personal practice in the workplace at every level in the company. >> mark, you do yoga yourself as well? >> yes, i do. every morning. >> i was telling becky and andrew about your personal style. your ski accident, broken neck, falling down ravine and spending a year on painkillers until you discovered yoga, meditation, acupunctu acupuncture. tell us a little bit about that personal journey. >> well, i think until i had to find my way through a health care system that's really not a system and had to struggle with a debilitating neuropathy. i have it. terrible pain down my left arm all day long. the medical system gave me drugs. the disability system told me to go on long-term disability. they told me that the best hope for me was to live a reasonable good existence on disability payments and to deal with my pain, to focus on my pain. wh
rate environment. >>> u.s. equities had been a little bit waerbg. they have been preparing their losses through the morning. dow futures only 11.5 points below fair value. we've been watching what happened overseas in asia. the nikkei was up 1 1/3. in europe, red arrows because of economic numbers. also concerns continuing about cyprus. the cac is done 1.1%. we have positive comments made by fed chairman ben bernanke. >> we'll use models and other indicators and the state of the labor market to try to make a good estimate how much we need to change the rate of flow. but, again, the point is to let the markets see our behavior, to let them see how we respond to changes in the market. and higher levels of purchases or the ultimate facing out of the program. >> in other words, it's not going to be spigot on, spigot off. rick is the head of strategy at wells fargo securities. rick, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> you have been right on some big calls in the past. you called it right almost to the day back in march of 2009. >> yeah. >> for the bottom. >> yo
-- >> is there -- how much is the business environment of the city and how much of the decisions being mid at the margin by whether it is wealthy people or people coming up businesses or somewhere else, how much is that affected? what tipping point is there when things like in positions and mandates like paid sick leave or higher taxes push people over that marginal line and decide not to open -- >> decree eighting opportunity, creating that path to the middle class of new york city, only helps create a stronger city. what you are seeing is new york city being made weaker. as we saw by the grass. the exodus of middle income workers. that's killing the city. middle mcindividuaclass individ backbone of the city. drying up bit by bit. s it is better to be the people of the city of new york. >> we have policies that make it attractive to come to new york. new york city is always going to be a best nation for people from around the country, around the world. and we have to make it's easier for not only businesses and no only the big companies, but the mom and pops. i have called for the elimination of some o
? the environment is so different. we have taxes and regulations. is it hard to grow a business in today's world? >> i don't think it's any harder. if you have the passion for what you're doing in believe it and find to let you know, what you are best that and exploit that a stake you will be successful. you know, that's what we have done all along. tracy: debt would be proud. but mitt david, but david founder and ceo. it's all about the passion. thank you. adam: politics. tracy: the compression shirt. adam: know because i no you're going to say something in that whatever response to it. thank you very much. it's tough work. even at that. president obama nominated thomas perez as the next labor secretary this morning. some republicans are already voicing concern about this. and jeff flock is live at the white house. i think the senator from louisiana is already saying no way. >> is going to block this in the senate. does not kill the nomination, but it does create some problems for the administration after thomas perez, the president's pick to lead the labor department is at department of justic
protection of the poorest and the environment. he said the role of pope is to quote, open his arms and protect all of humanity. those are the headlines. back now to tracy. tracy: i think he is cool, patti ann browne. thank you. >> thank you, tracy. tracy: we have breaking news of after all the back and forth and facilitating all day, cyprus parliament rejects tax on bank deposits for a international bailout. 36 votes against and 19 abstained. who knows where it will keep going. the story keeps going. adam: waiting for the russians. tracy: exactly. treasury secretary jack lew on a critical mission to china. earlier today he met with china's new president to talk cybersecurity and more. peter barnes in washington with details. hey, peter. >> tracy, that's right. cybersecurity is at the top of the agenda the new treasury secretary around the new president of china. just last month the private security firm mandy apt, tied the chinese military to cyber attacks on more than 140 u.s. companies. analysts describe the meetings in beijing as a get acquainted session that will set the table
. the media environment is vast. what represent fully indications will -- what represent fully -- what ramifications will come? what if i do have a government job? you never know. we heard about what happened in benghazi before during and after, not heeding warnings, covering up not quick enough. maybe survivors feel the story is already out there. i'm not sure. >>brian: everyone has a different perspective on the iraq war but yours is valuable because you fought in it. what's your thought ten years since it started? >> it's almost hard to fathom ten years since the war kicked off. i'm proud of what our generation of warriors accomplished, what we fought for. everything that we -- over 4,400 that gave their lives on that sacred ground. thousands more that were wounded in pursuit of that mission. i'm proud of what we did over there. i'm proud of coming home and fighting for the surge, fighting for the will of the american people to finish the job. i wish we finished it in a more proper fashion per se. i honor what these vets have done, and we're thanking them every day. >>brian: what do
. >> and to your point, joe, i think what's happening is a spotlight is being shown on the school environment. and the reason is, kids are in the school building 180 days a year. it is where they consume 50% of their calories per day. so you have a captive audience in the school building. but what we have to do is we have to direct more resources into the school building. the first thing that's getting cut is access to healthy nutrition. the first thing that's getting cut is access to physical activity. which is why we made an announcement with the first lady just a couple weeks ago, let's move active schools to get more kids out there and moving. it's critical, though, i come from the business world. and the first thing when i stepped into this epidemic that i said to dr. satcher and to some of our partners is, no one of us can do this alone. there's no one size fits all strategy. we have to do this in a collaborative effort together. so we focus largely on bringing the private sector into the conversation. how do we form a public/private partnership where corporate america is brought into t
are looking at that environment and saying it just doesn't work at the very top if we also want to have children. and so what we have to do is change the structures of the work force. we have got to say to our companies -- and i think this is the biggest feminist revolution. if we can change the shape of that border and table to make it more family friendly and implement more flexible work programs and have careers up and down uncan dial up and dial back again at certain stages. actually those companies find the productivity increases. the companies that say to women and to men we don't care about your input. we care about your output. where and when you work for doesn't matter but what you do produce matters. that works so well for women. in those circumstances, productivity rises for the company and you keep women in the work force. >> i venture to say we might be more productive when we have small children because we're on fire and trying to keep it all going and we are not checked out. every argument made here at the table is valid and i think the bigger point here, whether it's the
about money or the environment. >> i think life's about experiences and about connection and about relationships. and so i think you want to sort of maximize your time focused on that and minimize your time focused on acquiring more stuff and dealing with it. >> now, graham hill does acknowledge that if you're married or you have children, the minimalist lifestyle is a lot tougher, matt lauer. >> i'll say, the older you get, the more you like that no-clutter feel. thank you very much. i would like to try it, craig, thank you. >> thank you. >> when we come back, martha stewart's here to make us all feel inadequate about decorating our easter eggs. but first, this is "today" on nbc. for your first day? yeah. ♪ dad: you'll be fine, ok? girl: ok. dad: you look so pretty. ♪ i'm overprotective. that's why i got a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >>> martha on "today" is brought to you by macy's. >> and we're back at 8:51 with martha. fun and festive ways to decorate your easter eggs. martha stewart is here with a few of her ideas straight from the pages of "martha st
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